How to install Team Viewer in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and elementary OS

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Team Viewer is a free application that lets you get simple and extremely fast remote support, remote access, online collaboration, and meetings. It is immensely used worldwide including major businesses and personal home use.

The free version is only for personal use. Let’s see how to install it on your Linux PC.

Install Team Viewer in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and elementary OS

Elementary OS users must first enable PPA to use apt-get command before following this guide.

STEP 1: Launch ‘Terminal’. You can use keyboard shortcut CTRL+ALT+T or launch it from ‘Applications’.

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STEP 2: Install gdebi application installer for deb based binary packages. It is a powerful application that gets all the dependencies for you. If you don’t have it installed, use the following command:

sudo apt-get install gdebi-core

Enter root password to complete gdebi installation.

STEP 3: Now you can install Team Viewer. Use wget command to download the latest version of Team Viewer. Team Viewer is only available in the 32-bit version.

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wget https://download.teamviewer.com/download/linux/teamviewer_i386.deb

STEP 4: Use gdebi to install the downloaded Team Viewer package.

sudo gdebi teamviewer*.deb

STEP 5: That’s it. You can launch the Team Viewer from the dash. Note that the first launch will take some time and you may feel nothing is happening, but give it some 20 seconds and you should see the Team Viewer dialog box.

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Team Viewer
Team Viewer

Optionally, we can add Team Viewer to auto-start during boot using the following command:

sudo systemctl enable teamviewerd

Enjoy!

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Kiran Kumar
Hi there! I'm Kiran Kumar, founder of FOSSLinux.com. I'm an avid Linux lover and enjoy hands-on with new promising distros. Currently, I'm using Ubuntu as a daily driver and run several other distros such as Fedora, Solus, Manjaro, Debian, and some new ones on my test PC and virtual machines. I have a day job as an Engineer, and this website is one of my favorite past time activities, especially during Winter ;). When I'm not writing for FOSSLinux, I'm seen biking and hiking on scenic trails. I hope you enjoy using this website as much as I do writing for it. Feedback from readers is something that inspires me to do more and spread Linux love!. If you find a time, drop me an email or feedback from the 'Contact' page. Or simply leave a comment below if you found this article useful. Have a good day!

4 COMMENTS

  1. Additionally, you can also use tools like on premise R-HUB remote support servers, gotomypc, gosupportnow etc. for all your remote access needs. They work well.

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