LMDE 4 “Debbie” released, adds support to SecureBoot, NVMe

The highlight of LMDE 4 has to be its improved support as the system can now work with SecureBoot, NVMe, and Btrfs subvolumes. Moreover, home directory encryption is another notable new feature. Read on to find out more below.

The newest update to the Linux Mint Debian Edition is finally here. Before we get to discussing the latest improvements in LMDE 4, let’s shed some light on what this software is all about.

The LMDE project aims to reduce Linux Mint’s dependency on Ubuntu by giving the users a similar user experience. In simpler terms, this version of Linux Mint isn’t based on Ubuntu but looks very similar to the original version that is.

The Mint team also pays close attention to this project since it helps to make sure that their developed software runs even without Ubuntu. So, if you want to have a taste of Linux Mint that’s based on Debian and doesn’t have anything to do with Ubuntu, then you should consider having a look at LMDE.

Now that we know a thing or two about this software let’s get right into its latest update.

What’s New in LMDE 4

With this update, the Linux Mint Debian Edition has undergone a significant overhaul with several improvements. First of all, the main highlight of LMDE 4 has to be its improved support as the system can now work with SecureBoot, NVMe, and Btrfs subvolumes. Moreover, home directory encryption is another notable new feature.

LMDE 4 Debbie

Apart from that, users won’t have to install NVIDIA drivers and microcode packages manually, as the system will now install them on its own. LMDE now supports full-disk encryption and LVM, so partitioning can also be done automatically. Plus, users are also going to find a different-looking installer for this version. On the other hand, the OS no longer comes with deb-multimedia repository and packages.

Most importantly, LMDE 4 will be based on Debian 10 “buster” package base alongside the backports repository. Not only that, but the operating system will also accompany all the improvements of Linux Mint 19.3, such as updated boot menus, language setting, system reports, and much more than you can read more about from here.

If you’re interested in getting LMDE 4, it makes sense first to have a look at its system requirements. For running this operating system, you wouldn’t need a total beast of a PC as just regular specs would do. Firstly, you would need 15GB of storage and 1 GB of RAM.

If you want to go the extra mile, boost them up to 2GB RAM and 20GB disk space. Secondly, your system should support 1024×768 resolution, but even if it doesn’t, you can always drag windows to fit your screen by dragging them while pressing ALT. If your computer has such hardware, you’re all set to run the latest version of LMDE.

Getting LMDE 4.0

You can download the latest version from the official servers using the below link:

Download LMDE 4.0

If you already have LMDE 3 installed, you can follow this community tutorial on upgrading LMDE 3.0 to LMDE 4.0.

Conclusion

All thanks to this update, LMDE just became even more similar to the original edition, all while not depending on Ubuntu to a great extent. However, if you want to learn more about this update, you can always go check out its official release notes.

Zohaib Ahsan
Hi! I'm Zohaib Ahsan, contributor to FOSS Linux. I'm studying computer science, I’ve learned a thing or two about operating systems that are based on Linux. This has made me join FOSS Linux where I can share what I have learned with the rest of the world. Not to mention — some major tea is going to be spilled as well — as I share with you the latest developments in the world of Linux.

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