Fedora 31 officially released, here is what’s new

It took six-months of development along with a week-long delay due to Installer and DNF bugs, the Red Hat-backed distribution is now available for download on getfedora.org.

The Fedora Project announced today the official release of the newest version of their long-awaited Fedora 31 Linux distro.  Following six-months of development along with a week-long delay due to Installer and DNF bugs, the Red Hat-backed distribution is now available for download on getfedora.org.

What’s New In Fedora 31?

Fedora users are likely to forgive the developers for the week-long delay after considering all the new enhancements and features included in this latest release.

Two of the most significant changes include a redesigned background chooser along with the ability to create custom application folders in the Overview.

The new release makes choosing your desktop background much easier. Users can now quickly and easily see and change their desktop background and lock screen.

The new release makes choosing your desktop background much easier. Users can now quickly and easily see and change their desktop background and lock screen.
The new release makes choosing your desktop background much more straightforward. Users can now quickly and easily see and change their desktop background and lock screen.

The ability to create customized application folders in Overview ensures a well-organized and clutter-free Application listing.

The ability to create customized application folders in Overview ensures a well-organized and clutter-free Application listing.
The ability to create customized application folders in Overview ensures a well-organized and clutter-free Application listing.

Other features and enhancements include:

  • GNOME 3.34 Desktop Environment
  • Linux 5.3 Kernel
  • Python 2.30
  • Glibc 2.30
  • Node.js 12
  • Faster RPM Updates (via zstd compression)
  • Variable Google Noto Fonts
  • Qt Wayland and Firefox Wayland (default in GNOME)
  • Custom Crypto Policies
  • Automatic R Runtime Dependencies
  • Disable root Password Login in SSH
  • Improved Fedora Toolbox
  • Enabled net.ipv4.ping_group_range the parameter in Linux Kernel
  • Minimal GDB in buildroot
  • Improved Rockchip SoC Device Support
  • Gawk 5.0.1
  • GHC 8.6
  • RPM 4.15
  • GCC9
  • Golang 1.13
  • IBus 1.5.21
  • Perl 5.30
  • Erlang 22
  • Mono 5.20

Also included in the Fedora release is a plethora of Desktop Environments for users to choose from, among them, DeepinDE 14.11, Xfce 4.14, KDE Plasma 5.15, and LXQt 0.14.1.

Also buzz-worthy, along with the exciting new improvements and features included in Fedora 31, is one thing no longer available for users, namely a 32-bit version of Fedora 31.  This is also the first Fedora version, which does not include 32-bit installation ISO images.  Fedora’s 32-bit software repositories are no longer available.

Although Fedora 31 is the first release of Fedora absent 32-bit kernels, Fedora 31 still preserves support for applications with 32-bit dependencies and legacy hardware that utilize 32-bit drivers.

Along with the complete removal of Python 2 packages, the long-depreciated yum three package manager absent in Fedora 31, too.

Although only out for less than a day, reviews on the internet are already appearing and are overwhelmingly positive.

“Just installed it on my x220. Excellent release!”

“I upgraded from F30 and everything went smoothly. Awesome job by the Fedora team! After I get the AMD microcode update in November I’m also going to reinstall with Silverblue, so I’m still excited :)”

Expect more from FOSSLinux on the Fedora 31 release in the coming week.

Travis Rose
Hi, I'm M Travis Rose, a contributor to FOSS Linux. I have over thirty years of experience in the IT arena, at least fifteen of which has been working with Linux. I enjoy converting existing Windows users to the wonderful world of Linux. I guess you could call me a Linux-evangelist. Long live Linux!

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