Back In Time – System wide Backup and Restore App for Linux

‘Back in Time’ is a free utility for Linux that lets you perform a system wide level backup and then can restore your PC when needed. This application is similar to Windows System Restore or Apple’s TimeMachine, except that you get more control with Back In Time.

RSync Engine

Back-in-TIme is a great backup and restore utility. It is actually just a GUI. Under the hood is the powerful rsync engine that does all the work like taking snapshots and restore. You might have heard about TimeValut and FlyBack. They are immensely popular among Linux community. I feel Back in Time gives you more control and a simple user interface.

Back In Time GNOME running in elementary OS
Back In Time GNOME running in elementary OS

Backup Only when Needed

One of the best features of this utility is the “Places” or the Bookmarks column. It makes a snapshot only when something has changed in the PC, just like Windows creates System Restore point when a new program or an important update is applied to the computer. This is a neat feature which will help you save hard disk space by not creating meaning less backups of same thing over and over again.

User Mode Backup System

Another important feature is the ‘user mode’ backup system. You can set which folders you want to backup, and it includes read-only folders too, but you can’t restore the read-only ones.

Installing Back-In-Time in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and elementary OS

Elementary OS Loki and above users may need to first enable PPA before going to instructions below.

STEP 1: Launch ‘Terminal’ from ‘Applications’.

STEP 2: Run the following command to install the utility’s PPA repository.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bit-team/stable

STEP 3: Perform an update.

sudo apt-get update

STEP 4: Finally install Back-In-Time

sudo apt-get install backintime-gnome

That’s it! You can launch the utility from ‘Applications’.

Installing Back-In-Time in Fedora and Mandriva

Back In Time is already included in the official repository. You can simply search the program in the ‘Software Center’ and install it right away. Follow below instructions if you are looking for command-line way.

STEP 1: Launch Terminal.

STEP 2: Login as root.

su

STEP 3: You can install the non-free RPM Fusion repository source. Copy and paste this into command-line and hit enter.

su -c 'dnf install https://download0.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-$(rpm -E %fedora).noarch.rpm https://download0.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-$(rpm -E %fedora).noarch.rpm'

STEP 4: Use dnf command to install Back In Time.

sudo dnf install backintime-gnome

That’s it.

Kiran Kumar
Hi there! I'm Kiran Kumar, founder of FOSSLinux.com. I'm an avid Linux lover and enjoy hands-on with new promising distros. Currently, I'm using Ubuntu as a daily driver and run several other distros such as Fedora, Solus, Manjaro, Debian, and some new ones on my test PC and virtual machines. I have a day job as an Engineer, and this website is one of my favorite past time activities especially during Winter ;). When I'm not writing for FOSSLinux, I'm seen biking and hiking on scenic trails. Hope you enjoy using this website as much as I do writing for it. Feedback from readers is something that inspires me to do more, and spread Linux love!. If you find a time, drop me an email or feedback from the 'Contact' page. Or simply leave a comment below if you found this article useful. Have a good day!

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