Automount Partitions Ubuntu

Internal and external hard disks including partitions connected to the Ubuntu PC should get automounted, meaning they should be accessible after the system startup without having to go to the file manager to mount manually.

For some reason, if it’s not happening automatically by default settings, there is a fix for it. Let’s take a quick look at the steps needed.

Automounting hard disks and partitions in Ubuntu

This guide is tested to be working 100% in Ubuntu 18.04, but you should have no problems what-so-ever in Ubuntu 17.10 and above.

Step 1) Go to “Activities” and launch “Disks”.

Launching Disks from App Menu
Launching Disks from App Menu

Step 2) Select the hard disk or the partition in the left pane and then click on the “Additional partition options” which is represented by the gear icon.

Hard disk Settings
Hard disk Settings

Step 3) Select “Edit Mount Options…”.

Partition Settings menu
Partition Settings menu

Step 4) Toggle the “User Session Defaults” option to OFF.

Step 5) Check the box “Mount at system startup”. Make sure “Show in the user interface” is also checked.

Partition Mount Options
Partition Mount Options

Step 6) Click “OK”.

That’s it. Next time you boot the computer, you should see the partition automounted.

Adding additional authorization to mount

In case you wanted a layer of security and would like to set up authorization for mounting a hard disk or a partition, you can do that too from the “Disks” utility.

While in the “Mount Options” menu, check the box “Require additional authorization to mount”. You must enter a password to complete the setup.

Mount Options - Setting Authorization
Mount Options – Setting Authorization

Note that this authorization is only applicable to non-administrators of the PC. Admin user will be able to mount the partition without needing to enter the password. This also means that if there is only one account in your PC, which implies it’s that of the administrator, this setting has no effect.

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Hi there! I'm Kiran Kumar, founder of FOSSLinux.com. I'm an avid Linux lover and enjoy hands-on with new promising distros. Currently, I'm using Ubuntu as a daily driver and run several other distros such as Fedora, Solus, Manjaro, Debian, and some new ones on my test PC and virtual machines. I have a day job as an Engineer, and this website is one of my favorite past time activities especially during Winter ;). When I'm not writing for FOSSLinux, I'm seen biking and hiking on scenic trails. Hope you enjoy using this website as much as I do writing for it. Feedback from readers is something that inspires me to do more, and spread Linux love!. If you find a time, drop me an email or feedback from the 'Contact' page. Or simply leave a comment below if you found this article useful. Have a good day!

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How about xubuntu?