How to kill a frozen program in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and elementary OS

Although Linux Mint and Ubuntu (eOS is still a beta distro) are solid and stable operating systems, you can’t avoid program computer freezes due to the nature of the installed program itself. The beauty of Linux is its superior CPU and memory management. Linux hardly becomes frozen on the entire OS level. Hence, when your computer is not responding, you can just terminate the culprit program only instead of hitting the power off button.

terminal kill program

Kill a frozen Program in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and elementary OS

In this session of our Terminal Tuts series, I will show you couple of ways to kill a program.

Method 1: Using ‘Kill All’ Command-line

STEP 1: Launch ‘Terminal’. Best way to do this is by pressing CTRL+ALT+T simultaneously.

STEP 2: Use the command killall followed by program name that is not responding. The generic format is sudo killall program_name. For example if you want to kill chrome browser, the command is as follows:

sudo killall chrome

Method 2: Using ‘X Kill’ Command-line

STEP 1: Launch ‘Terminal’ by pressing CTRL+ALT+T simultaneously.

STEP 2: Use xkill command. This command is very powerful. This command will turn your mouse cursor into killing machine. While in this mode, click on the frozen window and the program is terminated!

sudo xkill

Did you find these commands useful?

Kiran Kumar
Hi there! I'm Kiran Kumar, founder of FOSSLinux.com. I'm an avid Linux lover and enjoy hands-on with new promising distros. Currently, I'm using Ubuntu as a daily driver and run several other distros such as Fedora, Solus, Manjaro, Debian, and some new ones on my test PC and virtual machines. I have a day job as an Engineer, and this website is one of my favorite past time activities, especially during Winter ;). When I'm not writing for FOSSLinux, I'm seen biking and hiking on scenic trails. I hope you enjoy using this website as much as I do writing for it. Feedback from readers is something that inspires me to do more and spread Linux love!. If you find a time, drop me an email or feedback from the 'Contact' page. Or simply leave a comment below if you found this article useful. Have a good day!

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