Googler – Google Search from your Linux Terminal

Googler is a powerful tool to perform Google search from the command-line. Let's check its installation and usage.

What if you are on your Linux terminal, executing some commands, and you need to google something without leaving the terminal? Is it possible to perform the internet search right from your terminal?

With Linux, everything is possible. You can google from the Linux terminal and enjoy the lovely terminal dark background. What more, you can even send the results from your terminal directly to your browser.

To make this possible, we shall use Googler. This genius command-line tool to google anything right from your Linux terminal window. Not just that, you can search Google News, and search for any specific website too.

If you are a terminal geek who loves to do everything with commands, then definitely this article is for you.

Pre-requisite

Before installing the Googler tool on your Linux, you need to make sure that the current installed Python version is 3.5 or later. Use the following command to check your current installed Python version on Ubuntu.

python3 --version

Check Python Package Version
Check Python Package Version

As you can see in our case, the Python version is 3.6, so you can move forward. If you have Python with version less than the recommended one, all you need to do is to upgrade Python to meet the installation requirements.

Installing Googler

Step 1. To install the tool:

  • On Fedora:
dnf install googler
  • On Debian:
apt-get install googler
  • On openSUSE:
zypper in googler
  • On FreeBSD:
pkg install googler
  • On Ubuntu:
apt install googler

Install Googler Package
Install Googler Package

Step 2. Check the current Googler’s version to make sure that it is installed successfully.

googler --version

Check The Googler Installed Version
Version Check

Step 3. Check if there is a new Googler version by letting the tool upgrade itself using the following command.

sudo googler -u

Let Googler To Upgrade Itself
Upgrade

Step 4. Check the Googler’s new version.

googler --version

New Googler Version
New Googler Version

Googler Usage Examples

Step 1. You can have a look at the Googler “help” option to know more about how to use it.

googler --help

Check The Googler Help Option
Check The Googler Help Option

Step 2. Now let’s assume you need to search a specific website. For example, let’s search for all the Ubuntu articles on the “fosslinux” website.

googler -w fosslinux.com ubuntu

Search Website For Certain Results
Search Website For Certain Results

Step 3. Assume you need to get only a certain number of results with a specific time. For example, search the “fosslinux” website for all the Ubuntu articles in the last two months and display only the first three articles.

googler -n 3 -t m2 -w fosslinux.com ubuntu

Get The First 3 Results In The Past 2 Months
Get The First 3 Results In The Past 2 Months

Step 4. To search Google directly:

googler ubuntu

Search Google For Specific Keyword
Search Google For Specific Keyword

That’s all about Google search within the Linux Terminal.

Hend Adel
Hi! I'm Hend Adel, a freelancer technical geek with successful experience in Database, Linux and many other IT fields. I help to build solutions to suit business needs and creating streamlined processes. I love Linux and I'm here to share my skills via FOSS Linux! Thanks for reading my article.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

STAY CONNECTED

23,271FansLike
385FollowersFollow
16SubscribersSubscribe

LATEST ARTICLES

MUST READ

Buyers who wish to go for a machine that is based on Linux often show interest in Chromebooks due to the form factor and extended battery life capabilities. Although ChromeOS power these machines, users can still miss out on a more genuine Linux experience. For those who happen to agree, the new Lemur Pro by System76 might get some heads turning.
Linux is growing faster than ever. As per the latest report, there is a drop in the Windows 10 market share for the first time, and Linux's market share has improved to 2.87% this month. Most of the features in the list were rolled out in the Pop OS 20.04. Let's a detailed look into the new features, how to upgrade, and a ride through video.

VIDEO: Linux Lite 4.8 Features and Desktop Tour

Linux Lite eases Windows 7 users transition to Linux much more comfortable by offering simple software like Team Viewer, VLC, Firefox, TimeShift backup utility, and a full Microsoft Office compatible office suite in LibreOffice.

The 6 Best Download Managers for Fedora

It is a well-known fact that using download managers can help improve download speeds as compared to web browsers. Apart from the inbuilt download manager wget on Fedora, just as on any distribution that is based on GNU/Linux package, there are more options to explore.

10 Reasons to use Cinnamon as your Desktop Environment

With the release of Gnome 3 in 2011, there was quite a mixed reaction from users and developers. Most of them preferred the original Gnome that got forked, and one of those forks was Cinnamon. Since the release of Cinnamon 2.0, Cinnamon has evolved to become a desktop environment by itself.

What is FOSS, and how does it differ from Freeware

The rise of the Linux operating system, in all its various distributions, over the past few decades has catapulted the popularity of Free or Open Source Software (FOSS). Let's guide you in understanding what is FOSS, how it differs from freeware and is Linux a FOSS.