How to create and edit text files using command-line from Linux Terminal

We shall discuss several ways of creating and editing text files using the command-line from the Linux Terminal.

In today’s Terminal Tuts session, we shall show you several ways of creating and editing text files that can be done easily and quickly using the command line.

Here are the following commands that can be used to create a text file.

  1. Cat command
  2. Touch command
  3. Standard Redirect Symbol
  4. Nano command
  5. Vi command

1. Cat Command

Cat command is mainly used to preview the text file content. However, you can use it to create new files and edit them, too, by using the redirection method. For example, use the following command to create a new file:

cat > cattestfile.txt

After executing the command, a cursor will appear waiting for you to enter any text you need to edit the newly created file.

Create a File Using The Cat Command
Cat Command

Once you finished editing your file and you need to exit, press CTRL+D. Now you can see the standard command prompt comes again.

To check if the file was created successfully, you can use the list command as follows:

ls -l

Check Newly Created File
Check Newly Created File

To ensure that the text you have entered was saved successfully, then you can use the command:

cat cattestfile.txt

Display The Cat File Content
Display The Cat File Content

2. Touch Command

In this method, you will be able to create single or multiple files using the touch command.

To create a single file.

touch touchfile.txt

Create a File Using The Touch Command
Touch Command

To check if the new file was created successfully.

ls -l

Check Newly Created Touch File
Touch File

Now, in case you need to create multiple files. Then you can use the following command.

touch file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt file4.txt

Create Multiple Files Using The Touch Command
Touch Command

To check if the previous files were created or not.

ls -l

Check Newly Created Multiple Touch File
Check Newly Created Multiple Touch File

3. Redirect command

In this method, we will use the standard redirect command to create a new file. Unlike the touch command, this method will be able to create one single file only at the time.

To create a new file.

> stdred.txt

Create File Using The Standard Redirect Symbol
Standard Redirect Symbol

To check that the file was created successfully.

ls -l

Check Newly Created File By Standard Redirect Symbol
Standard Redirect Symbol

4. Nano Command

Using the nano command, you will be able to create a new file and edit it too.

To create a new file.

nano nanofile.txt

Create File Using The Nano Command
Nano Command

A nano editor will open like the below screenshot, and you will be able to write and edit your file. Once you have finished editing your file, use the CTRL+O to save your file and use the CTRL+X to exit the nano editor.

Edit The Newly Created Nano File
Edit The Newly Created Nano File

To ensure that the previous file was created successfully, use the list command.

ls -l

Check Newly Created File By The Nano Command
Nano Command

To display the file content, use the following command.

cat nanofile.txt

Display The Nano File Content
Display The Nano File Content

6. Vi Command

In this method, we will use the vi command to create a new file and edit it.

To create a new file.

vi vifile.txt

Create And Edit New File Using The Vi Editor
Vi Editor

A vi editor will open then you can start editing your file. Vi is a little bit different than the nano editor, which means for every action you need to do, there is a command that you need to execute first. For example, if you need to enter the vi command mode first you need to press ESC, then one of the following commands:

:i --> To insert a new line.
:w --> To save file.
:q --> To exit file.
:wq --> To save and quit file.
:q! --> To exit file without saving .

Edit New File Using The Vi Editor
Vi Editor

To check if the file was created successfully.

ls -l

Check Newly Created File By The Vi Command
Vi Command

To display the file content.

cat vifile.txt

Display The Vi File Content
Display The Vi File Content

Conclusion

That ends our guide on creating text files and editing them using command-lines via the Linux Terminal. I hope you enjoyed it.

Hend Adel
Hi! I'm Hend Adel, a freelancer technical geek with successful experience in Database, Linux and many other IT fields. I help to build solutions to suit business needs and creating streamlined processes. I love Linux and I'm here to share my skills via FOSS Linux! Thanks for reading my article.

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