How to install Google Chrome in Manjaro Linux

Google Chrome is not available from Manjaro Software Center

Manjaro ships with Firefox browser by default settings. If you are a Google Chrome user, you should know by now chrome browser is not available from the Manjaro’s Package Manager. There is the Chromium browser, which is near equivalent, but for a complete Google experience, Chrome is the obvious choice for most users.

In this article, you will see the easiest way to install the Google Chrome browser. This guide is thoroughly tested on Manjaro 17.0.5 but should work on lower and upcoming versions shortly.

Installing Google Chrome in Manjaro

METHOD 1: GUI Way

STEP 1: Click the start menu and select ‘Add/Remove Software,’ which is nothing but ‘Package Manager.’

Manjaro Start Menu
Manjaro Start Menu

STEP 2: In the ‘Package Manager,’ click on the breadcrumb and select ‘Preferences.’

Package Manager Preferences
Package Manager Preferences

STEP 3: Click on the ‘AUR’ tab. It is the Arch User Repository where you will find hundreds of community developed packages. The package maintainer uses Package Helper to download the browser from Google servers and compiles it for Arch Linux based distros. It is trustworthy for seven years or so. So don’t worry – it is safe.

STEP 4: Enable AUR support by turning ON the slider button. Also, check the box ‘Check for updates from AUR.’ Click ‘Close.’

AUR Repository
AUR Repository

STEP 5: Select ‘AUR’ in the left pane and then search for google-chrome.’ Click ‘Apply.’

Google Chrome Repository
Google Chrome Repository

STEP 6: Google Chrome should download from the repository servers. Unfortunately, the servers aren’t super fast. So be patient, it is going to take some time.

STEP 7: Click on ‘Details’ to see the progress. After the installation is complete, you should see ‘Transaction successfully finished.’ The wording sounds like some bank transaction, but don’t worry, it is a free download.

Google Chrome installed successfully
Google Chrome installed successfully

STEP 8: Close ‘Package manager’ and look for ‘Chrome’ in the start menu. Enjoy surfing!

Launch Chrome
Launch Chrome

METHOD 2: Using command-line from the Terminal

Those who would like to get the Chrome installation done from the Terminal should fire the following commands:

Step 1: Install git using the following command:

sudo pacman -S git

Step 2: Go to Arch Linux AUR page and copy the Git Clone URL.

Copy Clone URL
Copy Clone URL

Step 3: Enter git and paste the URL by right-clicking paste.

git https://aur.archlinux.org/google-chrome.git

Step 4: Use cd commands to navigate to the “Downloads”>”google-chrome” directory.

cd Downloads
cd google-chrome

Step 5: Build the package from the source using makepkg command:

makepkg -s

Step 6: The package is built in the google-chrome directory with extension .tar.xz. Let’s install it using pacman.

sudo pacman -U google-chrome*.tar.xz

Congrats, Google Chrome installation, is complete!

Kiran Kumar
Hi there! I'm Kiran Kumar, founder of FOSSLinux.com. I'm an avid Linux lover and enjoy hands-on with new promising distros. Currently, I'm using Ubuntu as a daily driver and run several other distros such as Fedora, Solus, Manjaro, Debian, and some new ones on my test PC and virtual machines. I have a day job as an Engineer, and this website is one of my favorite past time activities, especially during Winter ;). When I'm not writing for FOSSLinux, I'm seen biking and hiking on scenic trails. I hope you enjoy using this website as much as I do writing for it. Feedback from readers is something that inspires me to do more and spread Linux love!. If you find a time, drop me an email or feedback from the 'Contact' page. Or simply leave a comment below if you found this article useful. Have a good day!

18 COMMENTS

  1. First I wanna say thanks to you.
    I have successfully installed chrome on my manjaro.
    I just came across this distro, and found it amazing though I used to have ubuntu flavors as my main os system.

    Thanks again.
    I have followed you at google plus.

  2. Im using the lates Manjaro KDE 64 bit. google chrome did not pop up in the add / remove software UI called Opctopi. My guess is I need to run commands to get it. I did find chromium though

    • Yeah I think the GUI has changed enough since then that the CLI method is easier to follow in this case. If you just want something you can copy/paste, just hit F12 to open the console and copy the following, one line at a time.

      sudo pacman -S git
      git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/google-chrome.git
      cd google-chrome
      makepkg -s
      sudo pacman -U google-chrome*.tar.xz

      Click on the Application Launcher (what would be the start button in windows) and Chrome should be there in Applications > Internet.

      • wow this tip was the rigth way to install Google but this OS have to have a easy way to install apps; like Linux Mint with gdeb.

  3. manjaro is worse than mint or windows to install. its like a case of hemroids something you can do very nicely without.

    is there a menu that give step by step instructions on how to install manjaro for a beginner????

    I was using mint but the problems I was having was worse than windows

    it seemed like every time I did the update some programs would quit and then try to find a fix for it

    read that manjaro is real easy works smooth as silk me thinks they were sucking on too much vodka or had their head in the sand as mint is a whole lot easier to install than manjaro

  4. Thanks for the article Kiran! I’m just now getting started with Manjaro after using primarily Ubuntu. I gave up on the GUI method pretty quick, after seeing that the toggle on/off for AUR has changed to an empty dropdown list. I moved on to your CLI instructions and it worked great, just a few minutes to clone the repo, build and install Chrome. From my time with Ubuntu I have found that I prefer dealing with software install/updating in the CLI anyways.

    I have a couple of notes on the CLI install instructions.
    Step 3 did not run for me as written, I needed to add the clone command before pasting the url, giving me this:
    git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/google-chrome.git
    Then in step 4, I found that only the second command is necessary (cd google-chrome) because the previous command was run in the default ~, not ~/Downloads. So I would recommend removing that line or placing it in step 3 before the git clone. You did a good job explaining the process, so I didn’t have much trouble working around this, but if I had not used git before and was still new to using the CLI then I think it would have tripped me up pretty bad like it seems to have done to the angry n00bs in the comments above mine.

    I did not mean to come here to criticize your article, and I hope you do not take offense. The tutorial was exactly what I was looking for, and I got chrome installed super quick and easy. Hopefully you find my suggestions useful.

  5. You can also use “yay” to install google-chrome from the AUR:

    yay google-chrome

    Select which branch you want, I chose “stable”
    Hit enter.
    Select “N” to see diffs.

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